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Last updateThu, 23 Jun 2022 3pm
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Velo3D Announces Sapphire XC 1MZ to Enable Large-format Metal 3D Printing up to One Meter in Height

New 1-meter Sapphire XC to Begin Shipping in Late Q3 With the First Systems Being Delivered to Several Aerospace Companies

Velo3D, Inc. (NYSE: VLD), a leading metal additive manufacturing technology company for mission-critical parts, today announced a new addition to its Sapphire family of printers with the Sapphire XC 1MZ. The new printer allows customers to print parts one meter in height—with a total build volume that is twice that of the Sapphire XC and nine times larger than the original Sapphire—increasing the addressable use-cases of Velo3D’s end-to-end metal additive manufacturing solution.

From CAD Design to Test Fire in a Week

Launcher depends on Velo3D to 3D print complex rocket components for low-cost, small satellite delivery systems

Humankind launched the first orbital satellite in October of 1957. Sixty-five years later, more than 5,000 satellites are in service, with roughly half of them placed into low earth orbit (LEO) over the past two years. Much but not all of this activity comes courtesy of entrepreneur Elon Musk, whose SpaceX-launched satellite internet constellation Starlink will soon account for at least half of the objects circling our planet.

Dassault Systèmes at ILA Berlin 2022: Sustainable future solutions for aviation are created in virtual space

The aviation industry is facing profound changes. Sustainability is also determining future planning here. In the course of decarbonising air traffic, hydrogen engines are increasingly coming into focus. And thanks to technological advances, urban, electric aviation is no longer a vision of the future.

From CAD Design to Test Fire in a Week

Launcher depends on Velo3D to 3D print complex rocket components for low-cost, small satellite delivery systems

Humankind launched the first orbital satellite in October of 1957. Sixty-five years later, more than 5,000 satellites are in service, with roughly half of them placed into low earth orbit (LEO) over the past two years. Much but not all of this activity comes courtesy of entrepreneur Elon Musk, whose SpaceX-launched satellite internet constellation Starlink will soon account for at least half of the objects circling our planet.

GE Aviation Singapore first to offer metal additive for engine component repair

As metal additive technology continues to gain momentum in the design and industrial production of new aerospace components, GE Aviation’s Loyang facility is the first maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facility worldwide that has been approved to use metal additive manufacturing for commercial jet engine component repairs.

To the Moon and Beyond with Additive Manufacturing

Aerojet Rocketdyne uses metal 3D printing technology from Velo3D to make a critical flight component lighter, smaller, and much less expensive than its predecessors

On the afternoon of December 19, 1972, Apollo 17’s command and service module CSM-114 “America” splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, bringing its crew and cargo safely home. The event marked the end of NASA’s eleven-year lunar program and humankind’s final visit to the Moon. Thanks in part to Los Angeles, Calif.-based Aerojet Rocketdyne—a manufacturer with a proud heritage in spaceflight and rocket propulsion—we’ll be going back soon, this time to stay.

Optomec Receives $1.5M Air Force Contract for Additive Repair of F35 Large Titanium Blisks

Solution has potential to Reduce Costs by 80% and Save $10s of Millions Annually

The US Air Force has awarded Optomec a $1.5 million contract to develop a Metal Additive Manufacturing system and process that enables the repair of oversized titanium components used in aircraft engines.

GE Aviation Singapore first to offer metal additive for engine component repair

As metal additive technology continues to gain momentum in the design and industrial production of new aerospace components, GE Aviation’s Loyang facility is the first maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) facility worldwide that has been approved to use metal additive manufacturing for commercial jet engine component repairs.

To the Moon and Beyond with Additive Manufacturing

Aerojet Rocketdyne uses metal 3D printing technology from Velo3D to make a critical flight component lighter, smaller, and much less expensive than its predecessors

On the afternoon of December 19, 1972, Apollo 17’s command and service module CSM-114 “America” splashed down in the Pacific Ocean, bringing its crew and cargo safely home. The event marked the end of NASA’s eleven-year lunar program and humankind’s final visit to the Moon. Thanks in part to Los Angeles, Calif.-based Aerojet Rocketdyne—a manufacturer with a proud heritage in spaceflight and rocket propulsion—we’ll be going back soon, this time to stay.


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