10312020Sat
Last updateFri, 30 Oct 2020 10pm
>>

The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index® Falls Slightly in April

The Conference Board Consumer Confidence Index®, which had increased in March, declined slightly in April. The Index now stands at 82.3 (1985=100), down from 83.9 in March. The Present Situation Index decreased to 78.3 from 82.5, while the Expectations Index was virtually unchanged at 84.9 versus 84.8 in March.

The monthly Consumer Confidence Survey®, based on a probability-design random sample, is conducted for The Conference Board by Nielsen, a leading global provider of information and analytics around what consumers buy and watch. The cutoff date for the preliminary results was April 17.

"Consumer confidence declined slightly in April, as consumers assessed current business and labor market conditions less favorably than in March," said Lynn Franco, Director of Economic Indicators at The Conference Board. "However, their expectations regarding the short-term outlook for the economy and labor market held steady. Thus, while sentiment regarding current conditions may have slipped a bit, consumers do not foresee the economy, or the labor market, losing the momentum that has been building up over the past several months."

Consumers' appraisal of current conditions pulled back moderately in April. Those claiming business conditions are "good" edged down to 21.8 percent from 22.6 percent, while those claiming business conditions are "bad" rose to 24.4 percent from 23.5 percent. Consumers' assessment of the labor market was also slightly more negative. Those stating jobs are "plentiful" declined to 12.9 percent from 13.8 percent, while those saying jobs are "hard to get" increased to 32.5 percent from 31.4 percent.

Consumers' expectations held steady in April. The percentage of consumers expecting business conditions to improve over the next six months was unchanged at 17.4 percent, while those anticipating business conditions to worsen increased marginally to 10.3 percent from 10.1 percent. Consumers were slightly more optimistic about the outlook for the labor market. Those expecting more jobs in the months ahead increased to 15.0 percent from 14.1 percent, while those expecting fewer jobs edged up to 17.9 percent from 17.5 percent. The proportion of consumers anticipating their incomes to grow increased to 17.1 percent from 15.3 percent, but those expecting a drop in their incomes also increased, to 12.9 percent from 11.5 percent.

www.conference-board.org

comments

Related articles

  • Latest Post

  • Most Read

  • Twitter

Who's Online

We have 2259 guests and one member online

We use cookies on our website. Some of them are essential for the operation of the site, while others help us to improve this site and the user experience (tracking cookies). You can decide for yourself whether you want to allow cookies or not. Please note that if you reject them, you may not be able to use all the functionalities of the site.